Ways to Use up Eggs

Posted by Mrs Money on March 3rd, 2011

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We like to buy our organic eggs from Costco.  They come in a two dozen pack and cost us less per egg than shopping at a store like Kroger.  The only downfalls about buying eggs from Costco is that they come in a plastic package and sometimes it seems as though two dozen eggs is just a little excessive.  I’ve had to come up with some creative ways to use up eggs every once in awhile, and I thought I’d share my tips with you!

-Scramble an egg in a bowl.  Before you wash your hair, spread the egg over your hair evenly.  It will help condition your hair and add shine.  Wash with your normal shampoo as normal.

-Make egg salad sandwiches.  Hard boil your eggs, chop them up into small pieces, and mix with mayonnaise, celery, onion, salt and pepper, and any other ingredients you’d like to add.  You can eat it like that or spread it on bread to make the egg salad sandwiches.

-Hard boil eggs and eat them as a snack.  Eggs contain omega 3 fatty acids that are good for your body, as well as protein.  I love hard boiled eggs with salt. Yum!

-Separate the egg yolks and whites and freeze them.   You can then thaw them and use them in baking recipes.  I haven’t tried to make them into scrambled eggs, but you may want to give it a shot.

-From local pastured eggs, you can separate the egg yolk and whites and mix the egg yolk into smoothies.  You can also stir egg yolks into soups and stews for a nutritional boost.

-Make omelets or frittatas for breakfast or even dinner.  When we are lazy, we like cooking breakfast for dinner.  It’s super easy and tastes great!

-Make deviled eggs.  Deviled eggs are awesome, and there are never any leftovers!

-Custards or even angel food cake are a great way to use up eggs.  Custard is going to use the yolks, and angel food cake will use the whites, so you may want to make them together!

-Scramble and cook eggs and feed them to your dogs.  They will love them!

How do you use up eggs? Do you ever have too many?

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19 Responses to “Ways to Use up Eggs”


  1. Becky R says:

    I buy the same eggs. They last a long time, but we never even get to the expiration date. I make lots of baked goods from scratch, plus my kids love scrambled eggs and hard boile deggs. I love deviled eggs, but forget to make them.

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Becky- That’s awesome you never get past the expiration date. Eggs rock!

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  2. Becky R says:

    p.s. why not split the 2 dozen with someone.

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    Mrs Money Reply:

    We normally end up eating the whole package :)

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  3. I love deviled eggs, and if there are any leftovers, it’s instant egg salad!

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Amanda- Yum! Love both of those.

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  4. Kathy says:

    I had to stop buying the organic Costco eggs. I bought eggs 3 months in a row, (we used a dozen a week) and each and every dozen had a minimum of at least 2 eggs up to 8 eggs per dozen that were bloody or more developed. That’s too organic for me and my family. I finally gave up and went with another stores organic cage free eggs from a different supplier. I have been told that the bakery uses the same eggs in their products, so we won’t buy anything made in the Costco bakery now either. I pay more, but haven’t had a single problem egg since I switched. This is in the Portland, Oregon area.

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Kathy- Eww. That is so gross! I hope I never encounter that.

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  5. Nicole says:

    My boyfriend and I have a dog, Winston, with really dry skin and some other health issues. The vet told us to feed him half an egg a day to help with that.
    One of the grocery stores near us is actually a bulk store that a lot of restaurants by from. Similar pricing and packaging to costco, but no membership fees.
    They sell packs of 12 dozen medium eggs (yes, 144 eggs) for something ridiculous like $15 when they go on sale.
    We’re currently planning recipes to use up all these eggs when we finally get around to buying them.
    At the top of the list is quiche. My boyfriend makes awesome quiche. buy the pre-made frozen shells when they’re on sale (we can get them for 99 cents some times, we just have to make multiple trips with multiple coupons, Canada sucks in the couponing area) and we get a lot of veggies for fairly cheap at different road side stands.
    We’re going to make at least a half dozen and pre cook them and then freeze.
    Hopefully it all works out!

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Nicole- Wow!! That is a lot of eggs. My husband is a chef and I’ve gone into his work and seen the cases full of 450 DOZEN eggs. It’s nuts.

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  6. Megan says:

    clever

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Megan- Thanks!

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  7. Emily says:

    We have eggs for dinner 2-3X/wk. Nothing complicated, just cooked up in iron skillet. Sometimes raw yolks in smoothie.

    Looking forward to the day we have too many eggs b/c we have ducks or chickens laying them for us. I don’t buy them in bulk.

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    Mrs Money Reply:

    Emily- I love that! I have never had duck eggs. Are they similar to chicken eggs in taste?

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  8. In my experience with dehydrating vegetables I learned in Mary Bell’s Complete Dehydrator Cookbook that you can actually dehydrate eggs. They need to be cooked first as scrambled eggs, then dried and then pulverized into a powder in a blender. I’m not exactly sure the process to rehydrate the eggs as she doesn’t give the instructions on that. But you could certainly blend the powdered egg into a smoothie for extra protein. I have used the whites to make meringue frosting for cake or pie. Also, hollandaise sauce uses up a few egg yolks. I read somewhere recently also that eggs should be completely scrambled if you are going to freeze them as the yolks and whites separate will have a stringy texture to them. Do you find that to be true?

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Mrs. A- huh, that’s interesting you can dehydrate them. I personally haven’t had any problems like that!

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  9. I have three hens and get three eggs most days. If not, I get two eggs. That makes about 21 eggs each week. I manage to scramble two at a time for myself about three times a week. 21-6=15 eggs. Then, I give the hens a meal each day of one scrambled egg with reconstituted powdered milk and oats, all microwaved. 15-7=8 eggs extra each week. About twice I break open an egg I will not eat. Those are ones that go to hens. With the 8 extra eggs each week, I can use 3 for baking. 8-3=5 extra eggs. Then, I manage to break one occassionally. When they pile up, i give the freshest dozen to someone who has done me a favor. It is not hard for me to use eggs my hens lay. Oh, once I traded a dozen fresh eggs for a $2 lawnchair at a yardsale.

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  10. Only chickens that have been eating green grass or green vegetation have Omega 3 in their eggs. In the winter I pick weeds for my hens or give them part of my salad greens. Milk, meat, and eggs from animals that eat grass all have Omega 3. Omega 3 is used to treat and prevent heart disease. Sorry for posting twice.

    [Reply]


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