How to Save Money on Groceries- Go Veg*n

Posted by Mrs Money on August 19th, 2010

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You are probably thinking to yourself: “What does veg*n stand for?!” Veg*n is a term used to identify vegetarians or vegans. Being a vegetarian or vegan can not only be good for your wallet, but it is also awesome for the environment. You see, animals consume a lot of food and release a lot of um, gases. When you cut back on your meat consumption you help reduce your carbon footprint.

2010-08-15 trip to Jordanville 040
Creative Commons License photo credit: Violette79

Another great point to reducing your meat intake is that you are freeing up food and resources for people. This is the logic- farmers grow corn or wheat to feed the animals. The animals not only eat that food that takes weeks to grow, but they are also drinking water and using land that could be used to grow other vegetables and crops to feed people. If we just ate more whole foods instead of meat, we would eliminate the resources to feed the animals and care for them.

I know that many people couldn’t go 100% vegetarian, and that’s fine. As long as you cut back, you’ll save money and help the environment.

Some good meat dish substitutes are:

-Beans and rice
-Vegetable lasagna
-Stir fry with vegetables
-Spaghetti with marinara sauce
-Salad with fun toppings!
-Bean burritos

Could you go veg*n? Do you limit your meat consumption to save money?

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21 Responses to “How to Save Money on Groceries- Go Veg*n”


  1. Lumi says:

    I’ve been a vegetarian for 13 years – it’s really not that hard! It’s been said that vegetarians could drive Porches and still be more climate friendly than omnivores, and it’s a fact that meat production causes more climate gases than tranport, so going veggie is really the most important single thing a person can do for the planet (and the ca. 1000 animals he’d kill/eat as an omnivore during his life)

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Lumi- Wow! 13 years! That’s great. That’s an interesting fact about driving a gas hog but being veg*n and still having a lower carbon footprint. Great fact!

    [Reply]

  2. I could never be vegan because I love dairy too much!

    However, I’ve cut back on red meat a great deal in my adult life (at least compared to my childhood). We eat a lot more poultry and use ground turkey in place of ground beef in recipes. It’s a smaller environmntal footprint and healthier!

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Bucksome Boomer- Dairy is one thing that I can live without. ;) I think it’s great that you’ve started eating more poultry versus red meat. Good for you! :)

    [Reply]

  3. Forest says:

    I have been vegetarian for about 10 years now (slipped up on the odd occassion ). As a whole it is much cheaper and greener but….. When many people switch they start eating things like fake meat burgers. These products actually have a similar cost and carbon footprint to meat so it should be noted that they are best avoided.

    My best advice for a new veggie is eat beans as much as possible!!

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Forest- WOW! That’s a long time. I totally agree with you- the fake soy and other products are horrible and cost way too much money. Whole foods are the way to go!

    [Reply]

  4. Evan says:

    Couldn’t even begin to imagine. We don’t buy a lot of steaks because of cost relative to chicken, but I don’t think thats what you were going for lol

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Evan- You are too funny. ;)

    [Reply]

  5. I’m assuming if my favorite meal ever is a medium steak with mashed potatoes, I probably don’t have a lot of veg*n in me…

    I love fruit and enjoy veggies, but usually as snacks and then sides with a meat…I never actually considered going meatless…seems weird for a BBQ loving Texan to even consider… :-)

    Maybe I could convince another meat eater to go veg*n for me…carbon checks and balances…

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    BIFS- You are hilarious! I think that is a great way to do it. :)

    [Reply]

  6. Little House says:

    I recently realized I’m eating a lot of red meat lately. About a year ago I made a note to myself to reduce meat items because of the resources they consume (there’s also a lot of hormones added to cow feed). I really need to reduce my red meat consumption and eat more pasta and beans. It would be a much healthier choice.

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Little House- Isn’t it sad there are hormones in food like that? I hate that. :(

    [Reply]

  7. I was a vegetarian for six years, then I introduced chicken and seafood into my diet. The only seafood I eat now is the occasional tuna-fish sandwich. I didn’t grow up eating red meat. I notice my meals when we go out to eat are much more frugal than what Hubby orders (he eats red meat, and that’s what he’ll normally order when we go out). When we’re back on our own again, I’d like to go back to being a vegetarian.

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Saving Her Life- I love tuna but I am scared of the mercury content so I try not to eat too much. It is one of my favorite foods, though!

    I agree with you on the eating out- my hubby loves to get carnitas and carne asada when we go out for Mexican, which is definitely more spendy than my $6 combo meal. ;)

    [Reply]

  8. H Lee D says:

    I cut out red meat in 1996 and almost 3 years ago I went full vegetarian. Except in certain restaurants, it has not been difficult at all. I bought a great cookbook and learned out to make some great meals that don’t happen to have meat in them, and life has been good.

    I don’t anticipate becoming vegan because I don’t want to take supplements (and it’s impossible to get B12 with a vegan diet, as far as I know).

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    H Lee D- That’s great! I think you are right about the B12 in vegan diets. I take a multivitamin every day just because I am a little paranoid about getting all the right vitamins.

    [Reply]

  9. I have limited my meat consumption when I was in my twenties because I toyed with the thought of becoming a vegetarian. My thoughts on have changed on that and today I would not become a vegetarian or for that matter, vegan. I have met too many people who damaged their health with a vegan diet to ever consider it. That said, I tend to limit meat to my supper meal so I don’t eat a huge amount of meat. And of course the best meat to eat is grass fed organic.

    [Reply]

    Mrs Money Reply:

    Mrs. A- I think it’s good you limit meat to supper. If I eat meat, I like to eat it at night too. :) Grass fed organic is so expensive! We like to buy this local meat that is hormone free. Makes me feel a little better. LOL

    [Reply]

  10. Money Funk says:

    Oh, you know I love this post! :)
    I agree. And to add, buy/cook with seasonal whole foods. It helps me keep the costs down, too. Or shop at farmer’s markets or go in with someone on a CSA box.

    I just found an awesome guest post, at edible perspective, from (never home)maker on the top 20 ingredients Vegetarian pantry list (way to go Ashley!). Ashley and her man are trying to cut down on their grocery bill, too!

    [Reply]

  11. Jenny says:

    I don’t think I could go without dairy products, but I could do without the meat, at least 99% of the time. My husband, however, will NOT, so we end up buying a good bit of it. I’d love to cut it out of our everyday diet just to keep us from consuming the hormones I know are in some of it. I might look around for some recipes that don’t have meat but are still filling–as that is my husband’s most common complaint about meat-free dishes.

    [Reply]


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